Teaching

Researchers can be great teachers — this is perhaps the most straightforward (and rewarding) way of transferring acquired knowledge — we dig deep in the subject and understand the fundamentals of the problems to be able to explain it to the others. As a PhD Student, I was a tutor for several courses, experimenting with my teaching character to find what suits me and my students the best. I also organized a reading group on Bayesian econometrics among my fellow PhD students to facilitate the exchange of ideas and cooperation. Some people say it is pretentious, but I think teaching should be lively: engaging and finding connection with students is crucial for good teachers.

Econometric and statistical courses I taught include Advanced Quantitative Economics and Financial Econometrics at the VU Amsterdam; Econometrics at UvA and Quantitative Statistics at Maastricht University all at the undergraduate level. These courses mainly focused on cross-sectional data and standard tests applied to them; time-series parts of the courses covered regression and principle component analyses, GARCH and stochastic volatility models, as well as, logit and probit models. Furthermore, I have teaching experience in Macroeconomics, Quantitative Methods, Management of Operations and Product Development. The scope of the courses varied from Keynesian Macroeconomics to Linear programming and optimization problems. Moreover, I supervised two MSc students in Finance and Financial Management. I think teaching should be lively: engaging and finding connection with students is crucial for good teachers. I believe that teachers should motivate students by asking the right questions, let them think, and make them curious about the subject. Elephant